Digital Awareness to Digital Utilitarian

Two unrelated new articles caught my attention last week. The first one was about a prominent Indian pharmaceutical company who seemed to have got into the news for their digital strategy. The second one was a comparison of prices for mobile data across the world.

The first news article about the digital strategy of a pharmaceutical company intrigued me, as it did many others – given a tweetchat that ensued during the day. My intrigue was about how this company used technology to do more of the same, rather than to carefully consider the different options that technology throws open. This is a classic case where digital is ‘done’ instead of the business transforming to leverage technology.

I will not embark on a long post on the merits of digital transformation since I wrote a bit on the topic in the past. Suffice to say that technology is best utilized when its potential is understood. Instead of looking to find how technology can help a business do more of what it is already doing, business leaders must seek to understand what new tech tools can offer and how those new options can transform the way they did business. “Moving beyond the pill” is not merely the stuff that ppts are made of. It is right here in the real world.

It is well known that there is tremendous growth in technology and the number of tools that have emerged from it. What is not so well known is that those tools have application in the pharma business model and can solve for many an inefficiency that business heads have worried about. Very rarely do business heads seek insights into the tech that they buy, or the tools that they deploy. Business plans, when looked at from the window of such insights, can look inadequate and tech can then be very meaningfully deployed to get much better results or to achieve a business objective in a much easier and cost-effective manner.

This is the essential difference between being digitally aware versus being a digital utilitarian.

A digitally aware business head generally considers digital to be ‘in addition’ to organizational objectives, thinks of technology as more important than strategy and will spend huge resources to buy new tech and as the novelty wears off, declare tech to be of no use.

A digital utilitarian will on the other hand, understand that the need to change is not because tech is available, but because the fundamentals of business and customers have changed. These business heads realise that customers are well into the digital economy. Doctors, patients and caregivers alike, search for a lot of health-related information on the net. Can you therefore not afford to be where people are looking for you and insist on pushing more money after bad, on a sales force that doctors increasingly reject? A digital utilitarian will thus, be acutely aware of the challenges that the changing environment has on his business and will look for tech solutions to *transform* the way he reaches out, engages and converts his customers.

Typically, pharma businesses grow when more doctors prescribe their brand and patients consume it. This means that these two sets of customers need to be familiar with the brand. The current pharma model falls short on both fronts. The company with the largest sales force in India can barely cover 3/4th of the doctor universe. Others fall woefully short. On the patients’ front, in most cases, pharma is still learning how to.

This brings me to the second article that caught my attention – the one comparing the prices of mobile data around the world. No one needs to be told about the penetration of mobile phones in India or the emergence of high speed and dirt-cheap (Rs. 18 per 1GB data compared to global average of Rs. 600) data connectivity. How many pharma managers have changed their plans or even thought about this? When I recommended this to clients I was countered by the lack of speed that accompanies the cheap prices. They don’t seem convinced even when I tell them that online video audiences are expected to double to 500 million by 2020. What does that say about speed and connectivity?

Almost every pharma business worries about increasing awareness, penetrating and gaining access to new customer groups and geographies. If these are your business challenges, shouldn’t you be looking for tech options that can help you achieve this? At such cheap data prices, you have so many options to create live channels, conduct social media campaigns, create communities, reach specific targeted customer groups or even something as mundane as increasing the number of contacts with your targeted doctors at a fraction of the cost of hiring new reps.

Technology offers a plethora of solutions and more to tackle these mundane problems that have plagued pharma for years. Pharma on its part has moved from being digitally illiterate to digitally aware. The next step towards business transformation would be to become a digital utilitarian.

One thought on “Digital Awareness to Digital Utilitarian

  1. The article is really amazing Salil Sir… It was an amazing experience to learn Consumer Behaviour from you, where you knit the threads of digital marketing into us. Your habit of always making us think made us explore more on various topics and penetrate more into the digital aspects of the Industry.

    Like

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