Selling in a digital era

Recently I decided to buy a laptop. As I looked around for the right one, I realized how little I knew about hardware. Having always used a company provided one, it was one of the things I had never bothered to educate myself on. As I always do for most things that I know nothing about, I spoke to friends. From what they told me, I did a lot of research online. Armed with information of an ideal laptop, I decided to “look and feel”. I headed off to an electronics store and spent the better part of an hour ‘testing’ a few models with the help of the friendly salesman before I bought the one I wanted. Do most of us shop this way? Maybe!

As you see, in my ‘journey’ the human element came in just once – to seal the deal. With so much information available online, I had already made up my mind before I went into a store and bought what I wanted to. This was a case of laptops and dummies, but is this very different in the case of drugs and doctors?

In such an era, pharma companies invest a significant amount of money into hiring and maintaining large sales forces. This component is, in fact the largest part of a company’s selling expenses. This is driven by the decades-old belief that nothing compares to a salesman calling on a doctor to convince him of a company’s product. Yet, in reality, the idea that reps will soon be obsolete is constantly reinforced by reducing in-clinic time for them, as doctors see lesser and lesser value delivered. There is also the constant pressure on profit margins as companies negotiate a fluid regulatory environment. These factors are as true in India as they are overseas. What is yet to be determined is if ‘non-rep’ models are bust-cycle fads that will reverse in soon to follow boom-cycles?

My personal opinion is that in any selling process, a human element is never obsolete, but the effectiveness of that element is maximized when it is introduced at the most appropriate moment in the ‘customer journey’.

old to new model

It is quite well known that in the new era, 70% of the buying decision is made before the first contact with a supplier is made. By the time I walked into the electronics store, I knew which laptop I wanted to buy, its specifications, its size, color and add-ons. I walked into that store just to see how that laptop actually looked and to understand the deals that the store would offer on my purchase. The salesman at the store already had a ready and willing customer and his sale was efficient and quick even though I made a big show of looking and evaluating other options. The actual amount of time he spent on making the deal was not more than 15 minutes of that hour.

Such efficiency is needed in pharma sales as well since the rep model is currently under stringent evaluation. Companies seeking operational efficiency are critically analyzing all major costs and are looking for alternatives. In such a scenario, instead of considering a ‘no-rep’ model, companies should consider a ‘low-rep’ model. This means downsizing a bulging force to just the optimal number of people needed to quickly and efficiently close deals. An example is illustrated below:

customerjourney

As companies build websites, apps, videos and other digital content, is this a ‘customer journey’ that they have at the back of their minds? Are they willing to prime a customer as much as they can using their formidable online resources and connect a medical rep as the final point of contact to seal the deal? If this is how it can be done, how would the medical rep’s job evolve? What kind of training would such sales forces require?

Of course, this isn’t an easy process. Moving away from a decades-old mindset of building armies of medical reps isn’t going to be easy. And to be sure, such models will probably not be the best in every single situation. For example, a new product launch will require a different strategy compared to a more established brand. The fact of the matter is, evolving technology provides superior alternatives to creating value for customers without having to compromise traditional sales metrics.

I am pretty sure the salesman at the electronics store was half-relieved that I knew what I wanted when I walked in. It saved his time and allowed him to refocus his energy to other dummies who wanted laptops. Wouldn’t drug reps and doctors feel the same way?

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Selling in a digital era

  1. Nicely put salil. Unfortunately pharma has always focused on confuse rather than convince thus making digital marketing a ploy rather than a weapon. Am sure it will progress.

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  2. Salil as always very well articulated. That the customer covers the initial steps on the brand adoption ladder himself fecilitated thru technology today , augments the conversion ratios. More so, when the human element is aligned to the overall customer journey design best suited to the segment or segments. You are the best suited to get into this field to help companies frame such staratgies.

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  3. It’s definitely a food for thought… Liked the journey high reps to medium to low to no rather than directly no rep.
    Thanks

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    1. Thanks Kalpana – had discussed this with Raman sometime last year. That’s where the idea germinated. Thanks for reading and appreciating.

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  4. Good one …the current challenge is dwindling competency of sales Reps ….with attitude to quickly change as per changing environment and skills upgradable at every juncture …this Model can be wonderful …as suggested the regulatory environment ….existing and becoming exhausting for industry ..
    To get the best…

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